Basement Toilet Solutions

Basement Toilet Solutions

Basement Toilet Solutions - Price Comparison Advisor

Basement Toilet Solutions

Basement Toilets Require a Different Approach Than Above-Ground Toilets

Installing a standard gravity-flush toilet in a basement is impractical due to the difficulty of accessing the sewer line. There are a number of specialized toilets, however, designed to keep below-grade installation from becoming prohibitively expensive. Read on to learn about the leading basement toilet solutions, including how much they cost.

The Challenge of Basement Toilet Installation

Toilets installed at ground level or above are connected, from underneath the floor, to the residential sewer line that runs inside the wall behind the toilet. Since the entrance to the septic system or municipal sewer line is located far below the bathroom (typically near the bottom of the foundation), gravity does the work after flushing. A gravity-assisted flushing system won’t work in the basement, however, unless it’s tied into the sewer lines below the toilet. This can be accomplished by excavating a portion of the concrete floor that the toilet sits on and digging a trench to the main sewer line. But as you might expect, the labor costs associated with such an endeavor are extremely high. In fact, they’re often on par with labor costs for installing the entire bathroom.

Get Free Price Quotes

The Challenge of Basement Toilet Installation

The following toilet solutions do not require any expensive concrete cutting:

  • Upflush Toilet: The plumbing lines for an upflush toilet run up through the ceiling and tie into the sewage line at the point where the basement ceiling joists meet the wall. A pumping mechanism found either inside the toilet or directly behind it assists with moving water and waste against gravity. This system is useful because the sink and tub/shower wastewater lines can be connected to the pumping mechanism, eliminating the need for a separate bathroom drain.
  • Sewage Ejector Systems: This option is basically a mini septic system. It includes a tank (sizes vary) and a pump that is housed inside the tank. The toilet – which is typically not included – sits on top of the tank and when flushed, waste is deposited in the tank. Like upflush toilets, these systems can handle wastewater from other sources.
  • Composting Toilets: A composting toilet uses little to no water, as the composting process is completed with heat and fans. The toilet must, however, be vented to the outdoors and there is also a limit to how much waste can be composted in one day. Many composting toilets run on electricity.
  • Macerating Toilets: A macerating toilet is a type of uplush toilet that additionally contains a macerating (grinding) unit for breaking down waste (and thus avoiding clogging issues). The macerating unit can be installed either in the bathroom or inside a bathroom wall (to reduce noise).

Basement Toilet Costs

  • Upflush toilets typically cost $600-$800. A professional plumber can usually install one in an hour or two ($100-$200) for a total cost of $700-$1,000.
  • Sewage ejector systems cost $400-$700 depending on the tank size. These systems do not come with a toilet, however, so one must be purchased at additional cost. Expect installation to cost $100-$300.
  • Composting toilets cost $1,000 to $1,500. Installation, which includes venting the toilet to the outside, can run as high as $500.
  • Macerating toilets cost a bit more than standard upflush toilets; expect to pay $800-$1,200, including installation.
Share
Basement Toilet Solutions - Price Comparison Advisor

Basement Toilet Solutions

The Challenge of Basement Toilet Installation

Toilets installed at ground level or above are connected, from underneath the floor, to the residential sewer line that runs inside the wall behind the toilet. Since the entrance to the septic system or municipal sewer line is located far below the bathroom (typically near the bottom of the foundation), gravity does the work after flushing. A gravity-assisted flushing system won’t work in the basement, however, unless it’s tied into the sewer lines below the toilet. This can be accomplished by excavating a portion of the concrete floor that the toilet sits on and digging a trench to the main sewer line. But as you might expect, the labor costs associated with such an endeavor are extremely high. In fact, they’re often on par with labor costs for installing the entire bathroom.

Get Free Price Quotes

The Challenge of Basement Toilet Installation

The following toilet solutions do not require any expensive concrete cutting:

  • Upflush Toilet: The plumbing lines for an upflush toilet run up through the ceiling and tie into the sewage line at the point where the basement ceiling joists meet the wall. A pumping mechanism found either inside the toilet or directly behind it assists with moving water and waste against gravity. This system is useful because the sink and tub/shower wastewater lines can be connected to the pumping mechanism, eliminating the need for a separate bathroom drain.
  • Sewage Ejector Systems: This option is basically a mini septic system. It includes a tank (sizes vary) and a pump that is housed inside the tank. The toilet – which is typically not included – sits on top of the tank and when flushed, waste is deposited in the tank. Like upflush toilets, these systems can handle wastewater from other sources.
  • Composting Toilets: A composting toilet uses little to no water, as the composting process is completed with heat and fans. The toilet must, however, be vented to the outdoors and there is also a limit to how much waste can be composted in one day. Many composting toilets run on electricity.
  • Macerating Toilets: A macerating toilet is a type of uplush toilet that additionally contains a macerating (grinding) unit for breaking down waste (and thus avoiding clogging issues). The macerating unit can be installed either in the bathroom or inside a bathroom wall (to reduce noise).

Basement Toilet Costs

  • Upflush toilets typically cost $600-$800. A professional plumber can usually install one in an hour or two ($100-$200) for a total cost of $700-$1,000.
  • Sewage ejector systems cost $400-$700 depending on the tank size. These systems do not come with a toilet, however, so one must be purchased at additional cost. Expect installation to cost $100-$300.
  • Composting toilets cost $1,000 to $1,500. Installation, which includes venting the toilet to the outside, can run as high as $500.
  • Macerating toilets cost a bit more than standard upflush toilets; expect to pay $800-$1,200, including installation.
Share

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.